Review: Jan Swafford’s “Mozart: The Reign of Love”

“The problem is that this story of Mozart that we think we know is not true at all; thankfully, Jan Swafford is here to correct the problem.”

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Review: “The Klondike Bake-Oven Deaths”

“In a novel to be released later this month, Hornblum—perhaps best known for his 1998 non-fiction book Acres of Skin, which centers on different events at Holmesburg Prison—retells the calamitous events of August, 1938.”

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James Madison, Greg Weiner, and What to Do about the Filibuster

“Patience ‘is the central constitutional virtue—and it is, by all signs, a lost one.'”

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When Reading about Abraham Lincoln, in 2021

(Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

“As historian James Oakes writes in his new book, The Crooked Path to Abolition: Abraham Lincoln and the Antislavery Constitution, the Republican Party was once home to a tight union of moral principle and constitutionalism.”

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Review: Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay’s “Cynical Theories”

“…it is hard to avoid the conclusion that the authors might have profitably started with an opening chapter dedicated to early American identity politics as well as postmodernism.”

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Review: Nicholas McDowell’s “Poet of Revolution: The Making of John Milton”

(Stock Montage/Getty Images)

As McDowell suggests, it was the liberating and open environment of humanist education that moved Milton more than any theological or political zeal, and it seized Milton at an early age.”

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What Is the Intellectual’s Duty to Society?

“In his new book, Hope & Scorn: Eggheads, Experts, and Elites in American Politics, historian Michael J. Brown adeptly probes questions such as these as he delves into ‘the uncertain role of intellectuals in a democracy.'”

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Francis Fukuyama: Making Identity Politics Work

(Stephane Grangier/Corbis via Getty Images)

“One of the core conclusions of Fukuyama’s Identity is that identity politics—the ‘demand for [political] recognition of one’s identity,’ whether that be a racial, ethnic, religious, or national identity—is here to stay.”

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“After Trump”

(Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks)

In what ways can we further immunize our governing institutions from the political malaise of today and tomorrow?”

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Our First Year without Roger Scruton

(Courtesy Princeton University)

At his best, Scruton was a panoramic thinker of formidable intellect who puts to shame many of the lesser polemicists who have followed in his giant footsteps.”

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What Ails Us?

(AP Photo)

The loss of faith in America, its promises, and its constitutional and democratic ideals augurs not only American decline, but American collapse.”

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The Historic Unifying Potential of the U.S. Constitution

Professor McConnell’s extensive study of the substance and scope of presidential power under the Constitution has convinced me that the unifying capacity of the Constitution could perhaps be revived.”

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Walter Lippmann and the Dilemma of Democracy

“In his 1922 book, Public Opinion, Lippmann notes that in a representative democracy, members of the public are expected to form opinions regarding public affairs with which they have no direct contact.”

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Kristof and WuDunn’s “Tightrope”: an Essential Book

(Games for Change/Creative Commons)

Whether one agrees with none, some, or all of their policy prescriptions, Tightrope approaches the status of a must-read.

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Blowing Up “The Big White Ghetto”

Williamson puts his finger on a certain, pervasive resignation that hobbles so many lower-class Americans—a resignation that must be explicitly attacked if our nation is to live up to its promises…”

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