Review: “The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality”

Now, given that genetics matters for these things, which, in turn, drive inequality, we should take genetics seriously if we are truly committed to egalitarianism.”

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Andrew Sullivan Invites Us All Out Onto the Limb

(Photo: Channel 4 / Screenshot)

“That commitment to truth seeking made Sullivan one of the earliest advocates for gay marriage and one of the most potent and consistent critics of ‘wokeness’ today.”

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Review: “The Memeing of Mark Fisher”

(Wikimedia)

Located within the framework of the Frankfurt School’s critical theory, The Memeing of Mark Fisher boldly riffs on everything from conspiracy theories and memes to economic policy and election campaigns…”

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The Political Import of Jonathan Rauch’s “The Constitution of Knowledge”

Rauch takes as his subject how we know what we know in public life, and what the greatest contemporary threats to our shared public knowledge are.”

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Review: Robin DiAngelo’s “Nice Racism”

One thing that sets Nice Racism apart from her other books is the depth of its cynicism.”

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Patriotism: The Supreme Political Virtue

(Brooke Hebert/Associated Press)

“Here, Smith steps in, and he admirably makes a case to both the Left and the Right that patriotism is a worthy political virtue in need of resuscitation here in the United States.”

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Review: Chris Bail’s “Breaking the Social Media Prism”

“To explain why the echo chamber corrective flopped, Bail puts forth an alternative theory of how today’s social media is helping drive polarization and mutual contempt between partisans.”

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Review: Stephan Haggard and Robert Kaufman’s “Backsliding”

(Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE)

“With that said, there is considerably more to democratic regression than the simplistic idea of evil, right-wing leaders whose ideas resonate with bad people.”

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George W. Bush’s “Out of Many, One”: A Message of Gratitude

“And at a time when so many, on both the Left and Right, seem intent on tearing everything down, President Bush reminds us how much we have.”

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Review: John Boehner’s “On the House”

NPR

“On the House does not provide a clear answer, but, if one reads carefully, one might find that Boehner’s short-term pessimism and long-term optimism are both warranted.”

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Review: Jamal Greene’s “How Rights Went Wrong”

“Greene uses abortion jurisprudence as a real-world example of how American law’s approach to rights has gone wrong—and has helped split us up into warring tribes competing for a zero-sum rights pie.”

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Preparing for the Work Only Humans Can Do

(John Thys/AFP—Getty Images)

“Merisotis has written extensively about higher education and the future of work, but Human Work is a departure from much of his past writing.”

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Review: Michael Shnayerson’s “Bugsy Siegel”

Jewish Lives

“It is a short and gripping panorama of life in 1920s-1940s America, that defining epoch of struggle and stardom, hardship and grandeur, fortune and bankruptcy—and Bugsy Siegel experienced it all.”

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Is Joe Biden the Future of Liberalism? Let’s Hope So

(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

“Will the Democrats prove captive to cultural grievance, identity politics, anti-racism, and the like? Or will they throw their lot in with Biden-style moderates…”

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Let’s Make the Founders Less Unique

(Bill O’Leary/AP)

“If our halls of power are rife with mini Aaron Burrs, what does that say about us?”

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