The True Origin of Palestinian Suffering Was Not 1948

Amin al-Husseini (Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

However, there was one man who positioned himself very early on as an opponent to this growing Jewish presence in his homeland. This man was Haj Amin al-Husseini, who, in 1921, became the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem.”

Read more

Review: “In Defense of Civilization” by Michael R. J. Bonner

“Bonner has done a great service in reminding us what true civilization means, the cost of losing it, and how we can regain it.”

Read more

Incurious: George and the Postcolonialists

“Schwartz-DuPre is dedicated to putting an end to the idea that Curious George is nothing more than an amusing story.”

Read more

Confessions of a Beautiful Soul

Despite the book’s homage to Friedrich Schiller via its title, we get nothing even remotely reminiscent of the profound intellectual mind meld between him and his great friend Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.”

Read more

Review: “Crassus: The First Tycoon” by Peter Stothard

“Now, Peter Stothard has given us the final decades of the republic through the eyes of Crassus—Rome’s wealthiest man and former consul who famously embarked on a vainglorious and ultimately failed conquest of Parthia that culminated in his embarrassing death.”

Read more

Review: “Uncommon Wrath” by Josiah Osgood

Pierre Bouillon’s 1797 painting “The Death of Cato the Younger of Utica”

“[Josiah] Osgood’s book is a welcome and exciting read about the rivalry between Caesar and Cato; Cato, in the process, finally receives some much-deserved due in the story of the republic’s final decades.”

Read more

On Literary Science and the Bounds of Knowledge

But philistinism is not limited to the arts. I believe that those who cannot appreciate the wondrous beauty of the real world as revealed by science are philistines, too.”

Read more

Review: “How Hitchens Can Save the Left” by Matt Johnson

(David Levenson/Getty Images)

“[Matt] Johnson believes that by adopting [Christopher] Hitchens’s approach—his allergy to party politics, his hatred of racism and nationalism, his emphasis on pluralism and humanism—the contemporary left will not just benefit at the ballot box but will also benefit morally and intellectually.”

Read more

Review: “The Struggle for a Decent Politics: On ‘Liberal’ as an Adjective” by Michael Walzer

(Jon R. Friedman)

Reading between the lines, we learn in fact that [Michael] Walzer believes that the Right, wrong in its continuing adherence to capitalism, but correct in its eschewal of intellectual fashion, currently has a monopoly on political wisdom.”

Read more

Review: Spencer Klavan’s “How To Save The West”

Being a classicist and student of Greek philosophy, Klavan turns to his education to solve these philosophical dilemmas.”

Read more

Review: Waller Newell’s “Tyranny and Revolution: Rousseau to Heidegger”

(Execution of Marie Antoinette, 16 October 1793. Executioner Charles-Henri Sanson shows her severed head to the crowd)

Beginning with Jean-Jacques Rousseau, proceeding through the luminaries of German Idealism and Romanticism—climaxing with Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel—then marching beyond Hegel to Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Martin Heidegger, Newell gives a reading of philosophy gone wrong. Horribly wrong.”

Read more

Review: Carl Trueman’s “Strange New World”

(Dominique Maria Bonessi/WAMU)

It bears repeating that this is a very good book. Trueman performs a thorough but concise excavation of the intellectual, philosophical, and metaphysical currents that he sees as moving below the crashing waves of our present cultural storm.”

Read more

Review: Bowen Blair’s “A Force for Nature”

“Nancy Russell was one of those great heroines whose quest to save the Columbia Gorge in Oregon serves as an inspirational tale that embodies the best of American grit and determination.”

Read more

The Value in Reading Byung-Chul Han

Han occupies a somewhat unique position in today’s world that defies typical Right-Left categorization. This is partly because of Han’s bridging of multiple worlds: East and West; art and philosophy; theology and politics.”

Read more

Review: Maurice Glasman’s “Blue Labour: The Politics of the Common Good”

“For Labour forgot that life involves loss and tragedy. It forgot that ‘human beings are not commodities, but creative and social beings longing for connection and meaning.'”

Read more