Augustine of Hippo: Patron Saint of Political Criticism

(“The Four Doctors of the Western Church,” Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430), by Gerard Seghers)

“In a brilliant stroke of irony, Augustine’s reading of Roman history not only reveals the many falsities of the Roman imperial mythology but also points the way to Christ and the Heavenly Jerusalem.”

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What “The Merchant of Venice” Has to Say about Justice

(From the Jewish Chronicle Archive/Heritage-Images)

“Just as it was in Shakespeare’s time, the questions of justice, mercy, and society remain as relevant as ever before, and we have much to learn from the great bard of Anglodom.”

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Herodotus and the Human Quest for Justice

“Herodotus, as we can begin to see, is a theorist of human action—and a theorist of justice. Justice, according to Herodotus, is the chief force of human action.”

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Lessons from Antiquity for Our Current Pandemic

(Plague in an Ancient City, Michiel Sweerts)

“Thucydides subsequently goes on to say, ‘In other respects also Athens owed to the plague the beginnings of a state of unprecedented lawlessness.’”

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Achilles, Priam, and the Redemptive Power of Forgiveness

(Gavin Hamilton’s Priam Pleading with Achilles for the Body of Hector)

For all the battle scenes, violent sex, and rage that fills the poem, the most memorable scenes in the poem are moments of love—especially loving moments of embrace.”

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The Human Impulse for Tyranny

(Neil Beer/Getty Images)

“Reading Pericles’ Funeral Oration as a standalone speech—independent of the whole work to which it belongs—makes us prone to falling for the seduction of tyranny which Thucydides so subtly investigates and rebukes in his work.”

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Augustine and the Politics of Love

Compared to the other classical political philosophers, Augustine stands apart from not articulating a preferred political order or what the ideal order would be. And that is the point.”

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Shakespeare, a Political Theorist Too

Hamlet (1948)

That they are tragedies also reveals Shakespeare’s pessimistic outlook on politics. Politics is a tragic necessity. But it comes with a cost. Namely, the forsaking of love.”

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Better Understanding Plato’s Republic

Plato’s Republic is not, primarily, asking the question ‘what is justice?’ as much as it is asking what kind of city do we live in? Before we can address any political issue we must first know whether we are living under a regime of tyranny or liberty.”

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Aristophanes: The First Poet Critic

In the words of German poet Henrich Heine: “There is a God, and his name is Aristophanes.”

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Sophocles and the Necessity of Family

Instead of the gods being our deliverance, the family is the instrument of salvation and the bulwark against tyranny in his surviving plays.”

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Euripides: Oracle of Modernity

Euripides’ gods are the gods of Hesiod given a new, cunning, and manipulative makeover. Furthermore, they are depicted as clear threats to the human social order.

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Why Aeschylus Still Matters Today

“But Aeschylus’ cosmos goes beyond Homer’s in presenting Reason, Persuasion, as an integral aspect of the cosmos that was otherwise absent in Homer.”

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Burke’s Aesthetics Formed the Core of His Politics

“Those who deal in political aesthetics have long noted that Burke’s aesthetics is the core ground of his outlook.”

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A Deep Dive into Ben Shapiro’s Book

(Gage Skidmore)

That ‘conservatives’ today celebrate the book speaks volumes of the leftward drift of conservatism and the confused state of existence conservatism is in.”

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