Why We’ll Always Be Talking about George Orwell

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“It is a shame, though, that whenever Orwell reappears it is almost always in the context of his dystopian political novel.”

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Review: “Saving Yellowstone” by Megan Kate Nelson

“Much like the United States itself, the story of Yellowstone is one of tragedy and hope, defiance and cut-throat ambition, beauty and terror, charity and callousness.”

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The Irresistible Passion of Peter Paul Rubens

(Peter Paul Rubens’s “The Elevation of the Cross”)

Rubens is my favorite artist, in part, because his paintings capture the totality of the human condition in its fleshy, pathological, and metaphysical realities.”

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Review: Bruce Clark’s “Athens: City of Wisdom”

Athens: City of Wisdom is a tour through over 3,000 years of the history of a city that has such imaginative sway and spiritual power over the hearts and minds of so many people around the world today.”

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Fifty Years of “The Godfather”

It has been 50 years since The Godfather was widely released in the United States on March 24, 1972.

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Review: Roosevelt Montás’s “Rescuing Socrates”

In this rousing story, [Roosevelt] Montás concentrates on four particular ‘great authors’ that embody and encapsulate the human condition who shaped him: Saint Augustine, Plato, Sigmund Freud, and Mohandas Gandhi.”

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Dante’s Divine Valentine

Henry Holiday’s “Dante and Beatrice”

“Love is the central theme of Dante’s Vita Nuova and Divine Comedy. It is from love that new life begins. It is in love that life is sustained and made pleasant.”

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Review: Arnold Weinstein’s “The Lives of Literature”

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“His culminating chapter is a love letter from his heart of his life spent in literature, his life as it matured for himself, and he has given himself and his favorite books to us to discover afresh and anew.”

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In Reply to “Jesus Mythicism Is About to Go Mainstream”

“As a former graduate student in religious studies and writer of the classics, it is deeply regrettable that the scholarship of the academy does not reach further and that century-old myths no longer of any substantial prominence in academic study still hold public sway.”

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Remembering Sir Roger Scruton, Two Years On

“At the time, I would not have guessed my encounters with Roger through YouTube and a handful of books would lead me to studying with him just prior to his death.”

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The Real Heroism of Odysseus

Francesco Primaticcio’s “Ulysses and Penelope”

“Odysseus has before him the fantastical dream of every man: immortality and sex. He ultimately gives that up for mortality with his family.”

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Is Ovid Still Worth Reading?

“Such politicized readings of the last 50 years miss the profundity of Ovid’s inclusion of the story in his grander poetic agenda of love being the constant star in the midst of a world of violence and transformation.”

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“Heroism” and the “World Soul” at Jena

(Horace Vernet’s “Battle of Jena-Auerstedt”)

“The flattering portrait Hegel wrote of Napoleon to his friend has subsequently spiraled into mythic legend. Why did Hegel have this seemingly lofty view of Napoleon?”

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Flyover Blues: The Enduring Relevance of F. Scott Fitzgerald 

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“One hundred years after Fitzgerald’s great novels, we are living in the same world as Nick Carraway, Amory Blaine, and Jay Gatsby.”

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Review: Louis Menand’s “The Free World”

In many ways, the book also reads as a eulogy to a liberal, liberalizing, and internationalist America.”

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